3rd Grade Module 1 Terminology

  • Terminology

    New or Recently Introduced Terms

    §   Array (a set of numbers or objects that follow a specific pattern, a matrix)

    §   Column (e.g., in an array)

    §   Commutative Property/Commutative (e.g., rotate a rectangular array 90 degrees to demonstrate that factors in a multiplication sentence can switch places)

    §   Equal groups (with reference to multiplication and division; one factor is the number of objects in a group and the other is a multiplier that indicates the number of groups)

    §   Equation (a statement that 2 expressions are equal.  E.g., 3 x 4 = 12)

    §   Distribute (with reference to the Distributive Property; e.g. In 12 x 3 = (10 x 3) + (2 x 3) the 3 is multiplier for each part of the decomposition)

    §   Divide/division (partitioning a total into equal groups to show how many equal groups add up to a specific number.  E.g., 15 ÷ 5 = 3)

    §   Fact (used to refer to multiplication facts, e.g., 3 x 2)

    §   Factors (i.e., numbers that are multiplied to obtain a product)

    §   Multiplication/multiply (an operation showing how many times a number is added to itself e.g., 5  5 x 3 =15)

    §   Number of groups (factor in a multiplication problem that refers to the total equal groups)

    §   Parentheses (e.g., (  ) used around a fact or numbers within an equation)

    §   Quotient (the answer when one number is divided by another)

    §   Rotate (turn, used with reference to turning arrays 90 degrees)

    §   Row/column (in reference to rectangular arrays)

    §   Size of groups (factor in a multiplication problem that refers to how many in a group)

    §   Unit (i.e., one segment of a partitioned tape diagram)

    §   Unknown (i.e., the “missing” factor or quantity in multiplication or division)

    Familiar Terms and Symbols

    §   Add 1 unit, subtract 1 unit (add or subtract a single unit of two, ten, etc.)

    §   Number bond (shows part-part-whole relationship, shown at right)

    §   Number sentence (similar to an equation, but not necessarily having equal sides.)

    §   Ones, twos, threes, etc. (units of one, two, or three)

    §   Repeated addition (adding equal groups together, e.g., 2 + 2 + 2 + 2)

    §   Tape Diagram (a method for modeling problems)

    §   Value (how much)

     

    9 × 10

    5 × 10

    4 × 10

    9 × 10

    5 × 10